Post Haste v2.0 – Now With More Awesome

Post Haste is a simple app that started as a script for a post house I was working in. They needed a simple way to set up a project folder structure consistently for all the edit suites. I got to work in Apple Script, though quickly realized it was limiting; I opened up Xcode for the first time and got cracking. The response was great. Some people had some really great ideas for the app that would make it even better. Unfortunately, being a motion designer & video editor first, my coding skills were lacking to add the features I and others wanted to see in Post Haste.

Several months ago, I began a conversation with Jon Chappell, CEO of Digital Rebellion about Post Haste. A few tweets and emails later, and he was fast at work coding alphas of Post Haste 2.0.

From this point forward, all maintenance and future releases of Post Haste will be handled by Digital Rebellion. I am staying with the project as a co-project director with Jon.

So today, right now, you can get Post Haste 2.0 from Digital Rebellion’s site, still for free. Here’s some of the new features:

  • 64-bit
  • Multiple Template Support
  • Edit and Create New Template In-App
  • Live Preview of Project Name
  • New Template Files Allow Easy Sharing of Templates
  • Optional History for Fields to Remember Previous Entries, Such as Clients
  • Folder Breaks for a More Robust Folder Structure
  • Assign a Hotkey to Launch Post Haste (Requires FCP Maintenance Pack 1.3 or Higher)

This is a huge update and Jon’s done a fantastic job. If you have any questions about this release, or the future of Post Haste, feel free to contact me or Jon at Digital Rebellion.

Thank you so much for your support of Post Haste 1.0-1.1. The enthusiasm & support from the post community is what made it possible to develop the software in the first place. Now, it will go even farther in the hands of a talented developer.

Ramen – Not Just Cheap Noodles

I just found out about Ramen, an open-source, node-based compositing application today. It looks promising, if for no reason other than to get node-based workflows in the hands of more people.

I’ll have to give this a try tonight when I get home… Maybe. The only way to get the software is to download the source and compile it yourself. I’m pretty sure that means I’ll be messing around with installing dependencies for a while before I ever get to try it out.

If and when I get around to compiling, installing, and playing with this, I’ll post a review.

(via @Kashaan & @BoundaryVFX)

Introducing Post Haste

UPDATE: Humble pie. I already had to fix a pretty critical bug. Post Haste 1.0.1 has just been released.

One of the more tedious tasks in post, with the exception of rotoscoping, is just setting up a project. A while back, we discovered the usefulness using a template folder to keep everything consistent. Thomas Tomchak at Suite Take goes into great detail about project templates. But we were still duplicating folders, copying and pasting, and renaming multiple files before we could get started. I decided to make the write my own software to make things easier. The result is Post Haste.

Post Haste really just does one thing, but does it well: automatically generates a project folder for you. All you have to do is enter information such as project number, client, etc. and Post Haste will create a project folder with files in place and renamed. It’s customizable to allow up to five fields of information and auto-fills certain fields such as date, editor, or suite. Take a look.

Post Haste is completely free. There are no nag dialogues about how you should give me money. Really, I wrote the program for myself to make things easier. But to make things interesting, I’m releasing Post Haste as “luchware.” If you find it useful, consider buying me lunch.

Software Isn’t Expensive

Many people complain that some software is too expensive. I think it comes down to a fundamental difference in how software is viewed. I believe (most) software is a tool. I think others view (all) software as entertainment.

While Marco Arment was referring to the recent MacHeist bundle, this argument holds true to any software:

Most software is an incredibly good deal, especially the applications that you use every day or as part of your business. For example, given that I make all of my living by using TextMate, and it was developed entirely by Allan Odgaard over (probably) thousands of hours, it would be ridiculous for me to haggle its €39 price.

I am very, very tired of hearing “Photoshop costs too much” or “Why should I pay so much for software I don’t fully use?” To which I respond, respectively, “No it doesn’t,” and “You shouldn’t. Instead opt for different software that fits your budget/goals/skillset/featureset.”

Now, this may sound elitist, but professional software is priced for professionals who make a living using that product. Final Cut Studio & Adobe Production Bundle (as examples) are priced acceptably, as I can make that money back rather quickly on the jobs I take on. If you just want to use Photoshop to touch up some family photos, make LOL Cats, or doodle, there are countless other options for you (Photoshop Elements, GIMP, Acorn, Pixelmator, etc.). Several hundred (or thousand) dollars for software which professionals can easily make back using said software is not unreasonable. Do you want me to price out a full Avid suite for you?

If you view software as nothing more than entertainment, you probably would expect to pay no more than $50 for anything. It is a point-of-view I can fully understand; however, you then should not be looking at professional software, and you definitely should not complain about its price-points.

[hat-tip to @digitalreb for the original link]

This Now Please (iPhone Camera Monitoring)

ProLost has an interesting idea for an iPhone software/accessory. As you may have heard today, Apple had a press event to discuss the upcoming iPhone 3.0 software. One of the features is the ability to access devices through the dock connector. Imagination went wild:


The idea is that someone could manufacture an HDMI-to-Dock Connector accessory to monitor footage in the field. (I love the addition of lens settings & RGB waveform, by the way.)

However, while I don’t want to rain on anyone’s parade, I’m pretty sure this isn’t quite possible. I doubt the iPhone hardware is capable of crunching HD video. But perhaps that hardware accessory itself could crunch the video down to iPod friendly 480×360 h.264 video on the fly? With the ability for the on-screen controls to send commands to the accessory to show pixel-pixel video (with paning, of course) for a focus aide?

Actually, hot damn! That does sound like an awesome idea!

3D Morphable Face

3dfacemorphTake a look at this 3D morphable model face demo by Volker Blantz. The automated matching of Tom Hanks’ face is amazing, but I was even more impressed with the Audrey Hepburn and Mona Lisa sequences.

Apparently, it can sample multiple facial models and extract bone structures, facial expressions, gender, and more. It does seem to approach the uncanny valley, and at other times caricature, but overall, this is very impressive. I guess that’s one step closer to S1m0ne.

[via Motionographer]